Showing posts tagged china

New photos of Tiananmen Square after the massacre

It amazes me to think that Chinese youth have never heard what happened at Tiananmen Square on June 4, 1989. But, because of government censorship, that’s the truth.

A Chinese activist and blogger saw a woman’s family photo album that contained photos taken in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989, by her husband who was a soldier. The blogger took pictures of the pictures and posted them online in 2007, but the Chinese government deleted them. They were re-posted successfully in 2009 on Twitter on the 20th anniversary. This year the blogger posted them on Facebook and Flicker, but attempts to post on Chinese sites have been unsuccessful.  

France 24 reports:

Zuola is a blogger and activist from mainland China who currently lives in Taipei, Taiwan.
 
In 2007, I met a woman on a train, and we started talking about Tiananmen. She showed me her family’s photo album. Her husband, a soldier, was sent to Tiananmen in 1989. He took these photos on June 5, 1989, the day after the massacre. She didn’t tell me much more than that. I think she didn’t realise that what were just a few snapshots in a family album to her was is proof for many others of the violence that took place on that fateful day. I realized how important this was, so I asked her if she would give me her photos. She refused, so instead I took pictures of them.
 
She told me that many soldiers who had participated in the massacre were never given public sector jobs, as was generally the tradition in this communist system. I imagine the authorities were very worried that after what they had seen and done, these soldiers might actually end up defending democracy.


"Thirty minutes after I posted the photos on Weibo, the site deleted them"

To this day, the exact number of people killed that night remains unknown. According to the Chinese government, several hundred people died, including soldiers.
 
The Chinese authorities censor all information relating to this incident. Typing “Tiananmen” on Chinese search engines only turns up a slideshow of postcard-like photos of the square. In addition, the authorities do not allow any commemorations of this event. Each year, as June 4 approaches, they ramp up security on the ground and online (key words like “four six” and “candle” are currently censored on microblogging site Sina Weibo).
  

China’s Jiaolong submersible completed two diving practices for its 7,000-meter dive to the Mariana Trench scheduled for Sunday, June 3.


  

200 years of global energy use


"If you want to tell the story of worldwide energy consumption over the past 200 years, you need three chapters. Chapter 1: The Coal Age. Chapter 2: The Oil Age. Chapter 3: The China Age. “

(Source: The Atlantic)

  

Photos From A Chinese Gangster’s Lost Cell Phone

(Source: BuzzFeed)

  
Red Deer Cave People: another set of new, old humans
“An article in PLoS One discusses a set of human remains from China, dating to about 11,000 years old, containing a mix of modern and archaic hominid traits and may suggest a late-surviving set of archaic hominids, or part of an earlier human migration out of Africa that has been undetected until now.”

Red Deer Cave People: another set of new, old humans

An article in PLoS One discusses a set of human remains from China, dating to about 11,000 years old, containing a mix of modern and archaic hominid traits and may suggest a late-surviving set of archaic hominids, or part of an earlier human migration out of Africa that has been undetected until now.”


  

China bans “sex” and “God” from health supplements

REUTERS — China’s State Food and Drug Administration will outlaw words it classed as ‘vulgar or linked with superstition, such as: sex, God, immortal,’ from the names of health products, according to the report on official news agency Xinhua.

The terms “powerful”, “magical results”, “miraculous” and “extraordinary” will also be proscribed, it said.

For years, China has been plagued by a series of cases involving quality concerns over food and drugs that have alarmed many of its citizens.

The government has tried to restore confidence in the country’s goods by pledging repeated crackdowns on the loosely regulated food and drug industry, in response to rising consumer complaints about bogus medical guarantees and inadequate drug supervision.

Zheng Xiaoyu, former head of the State Food and Drug Administration, was executed in July 2007 for taking bribes and dereliction of duty after a series of drug safety scandals on his watch.

(Source: in.reuters.com)

  

What the rise and fall of Bo Xilai says about China’s future

Chongqing: the city in a cloud

Very few in the West may have heard of it, but this sprawling megacity with a population of 32 million is bigger than most European countries. And the electrifying rise and fall of its high-profile Communist Party secretary - an ambitious and charismatic politician called Bo Xilai – has arguably caused the biggest political ructions in China since the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989.”

(Source: telegraph.co.uk)