Showing posts tagged art
Everything you can imagine is real.
Pablo Picasso

  

"Neo-Native" politically activist indigenous art by Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun of Coast Salish heritage. 

His latest work is on exhibit at Macaulay Fine Art, Vancouver, in a solo show, Indian World. In vivid colors, he merges traditional native iconography with statements about aboriginal issues – from the environment to land claims. His political roots come partly from his father, a founder of the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs. 


  

Graffiti artist Jonathan Matas paints a San Francisco alley end to end. @jonathanmatas featured on Instagram last week. He says if people “even have a tiny moment of joy or inspiration, then it’s worth posting.”


  

How unions might save the creative class

Interesting article about why musicians, writers and artists might benefit from organizing. Salon’s David Byrne writes 

So is it time for artists to strap on a hard hat? Maybe unions or artists guilds can serve and protect an embattled creative class. With musicians typically operating without record labels, journalists increasingly working as freelancers as newspapers shed staff, and book publishing beginning what looks like a period of compression, unions might take some of the risk and sting out of our current state of creative destruction.

  

Infrared photos shot by Richard Mosse in Democratic Republic of Congo. FastCo reports:

“These tragic narratives urgently need telling but cannot be easily described.” Photographing a war-ravaged village with normal film was somehow not enough—Aerochrome became a way to mark the sheer, surreal horror of a conflict in which 5.4 million people have died. In a 2011 interview with Aperture Magazine, he explains his instinct thusly:

In my practice, I struggle with the challenge of representing abstract or contingent phenomena. The camera’s dumb optic is intensely literal, yet the world is far from being simple or transparent. Air disasters, terrorism, the simulated nature of modern warfare, the cultural interface between an occupying force and its enemy, the martyr drive in Islamic extremism, the intangibility of Eastern Congo’s conflict—these are all subjects that are very difficult to express with traditional documentary realism; they are difficult to perceive in their own right. Very often I am fighting simply to represent the subject, just to find a way to put it before the lens, or make it visible by its very absence. This process is inherently “Romantic” because it often requires a retreat into my own imagination, into my own symbolic order.

  
'Five scoops' - Oil on canvas by Joram Roukes

'Five scoops' - Oil on canvas by Joram Roukes


  

'Islands, Hong Kong'

by Reinhard Krug

(Source: artistaday.com)

  
"Selective Amnesia"
Visual artist/illustrator Ana Correal - Bogota, Colombia

"Selective Amnesia"

Visual artist/illustrator Ana Correal - Bogota, Colombia


  
by Farhad Moshiri and Shirin Aliabadi 
Perverted Collage, 2003 (above) effectively explores possible contradictions and paradoxes regarding censorship in Iran.
The collage gathers together a collection of family magazines, many of which feature young girls on their covers. Iran places no restrictions on female dress before the age of puberty, and magazines commonly use this as a kind of loophole enabling them to depict looks that are censored on adult female models.
Western audiences are increasingly sensitive regarding the use of children in contexts which might be seen as prematurely sexualised or exploitative. In Iran, the substitution of small girls for adult models does not pose any such moral dilemma.

by Farhad Moshiri and Shirin Aliabadi 

Perverted Collage, 2003 (above) effectively explores possible contradictions and paradoxes regarding censorship in Iran.

The collage gathers together a collection of family magazines, many of which feature young girls on their covers. Iran places no restrictions on female dress before the age of puberty, and magazines commonly use this as a kind of loophole enabling them to depict looks that are censored on adult female models.

Western audiences are increasingly sensitive regarding the use of children in contexts which might be seen as prematurely sexualised or exploitative. In Iran, the substitution of small girls for adult models does not pose any such moral dilemma.


  
'A part of it', Acrilic and oil on canvas
Lorella Paleni, New York, NY
Seriously. Can art get any cooler?
The core of her work lies in the idea of an existence without the constraint of linear time is which is composed of every instant of the past and present simultaneously.

'A part of it', Acrilic and oil on canvas

Lorella Paleni, New York, NY

Seriously. Can art get any cooler?

The core of her work lies in the idea of an existence without the constraint of linear time is which is composed of every instant of the past and present simultaneously.

  
"If Only We Could See 3" - Paper, Acrylic & Pen
Lisa Rodden, Sydney, Australia

"If Only We Could See 3" - Paper, Acrylic & Pen

Lisa Rodden, Sydney, Australia


  
  
Wire sculpture by David Oliveira

Wire sculpture by David Oliveira


  
Hiker finds stolen Picasso leaning against a fence
MARIN COUNTY — A Pablo Picasso lithograph worth an estimated $30,000 has been recovered after it was taken from the Novato mansion of imprisoned former Ukrainian Prime Minister Pavlo Lazarenko… “It’s something that you don’t find usually on your morning hikes,” said Greg Atamaniuk, the man who found the piece at the entrance to an open space trail.

Hiker finds stolen Picasso leaning against a fence

MARIN COUNTY — A Pablo Picasso lithograph worth an estimated $30,000 has been recovered after it was taken from the Novato mansion of imprisoned former Ukrainian Prime Minister Pavlo Lazarenko… “It’s something that you don’t find usually on your morning hikes,” said Greg Atamaniuk, the man who found the piece at the entrance to an open space trail.

  

Beef Jerky Sasquatch

Mosaic artist Jason Mecier used 80 bags of Jack Link’s Beef Jerky to make this masterpiece for National Beef Jerky Day (June 12).